General info for Lancaster B Mk III

  • Country Britain
  • Vehicle role Heavy Bomber / Long Range Bomber
  • Rank 4
  • Battle rating in
    • arcade battles 5
    • realistic battles 5.7
    • simulator battles 6

Extended parameters

Arcade Battles
  • Price 360,000€
  • Wp bonus 120%
  • Exp bonus 184%
  • Max speed 462 km/h
  • Turn time 48.0 s
  • Training cost 100,000€
  • Climb speed 8.6 m/s
  • Airfield len 750 m
  • Free repairs 10
  • Mass per sec (shot)
  • Max altitude 7620 m
  • Max speed alt 3048 m
  • Weapon presets 8
  • Full repair cost 10,000€
  • Weapon
    Turret: 12.7 mm M2 Browning machine gun x2 (Ammo: 5000) Reload Time 20s
    Turret x2: 7.7 mm Browning machine gun x2 (Ammo: 4000) Reload Time 15s
    250 LB G.P. Mk.IV bomb x14
  • Full repair time crew 4d 21h
Realistic Battles
  • Price 360,000€
  • Wp bonus 370%
  • Exp bonus 184%
  • Max speed 462 km/h
  • Turn time 48.0 s
  • Training cost 100,000€
  • Climb speed 8.6 m/s
  • Airfield len 750 m
  • Free repairs 10
  • Mass per sec (shot)
  • Max altitude 7620 m
  • Max speed alt 3048 m
  • Weapon presets 8
  • Full repair cost 19,098€
  • Weapon
    Turret: 12.7 mm M2 Browning machine gun x2 (Ammo: 5000) Reload Time 20s
    Turret x2: 7.7 mm Browning machine gun x2 (Ammo: 4000) Reload Time 15s
    250 LB G.P. Mk.IV bomb x14
  • Full repair time crew 9d
Simulator Battles
  • Price 360,000€
  • Wp bonus 380%
  • Exp bonus 184%
  • Max speed 462 km/h
  • Turn time 48.0 s
  • Training cost 100,000€
  • Climb speed 8.6 m/s
  • Airfield len 750 m
  • Free repairs 10
  • Mass per sec (shot)
  • Max altitude 7620 m
  • Max speed alt 3048 m
  • Weapon presets 8
  • Full repair cost 23,200€
  • Weapon
    Turret: 12.7 mm M2 Browning machine gun x2 (Ammo: 5000) Reload Time 20s
    Turret x2: 7.7 mm Browning machine gun x2 (Ammo: 4000) Reload Time 15s
    250 LB G.P. Mk.IV bomb x14
  • Full repair time crew 9d

Lancaster B Mk III / statistics for the last 1 month

These may be very different from the real, because we are monitoring only those players who use our site.

Arcade Battles
  • Battles 74
  • Win rate 62.75%
  • Air frags per battle N/A
  • Air frags per death N/A
  • Ground frags per battle 6.29
  • Ground frags per death 6.62
Realistic Battles
  • Battles 71
  • Win rate N/A
  • Air frags per battle N/A
  • Air frags per death N/A
  • Ground frags per battle 1.06
  • Ground frags per death 0.85
Simulator Battles
  • Battles 62
  • Win rate 100%
  • Air frags per battle N/A
  • Air frags per death N/A
  • Ground frags per battle N/A
  • Ground frags per death N/A

Video about Lancaster B Mk III

TommyTheThompson45

War Thunder : Lancaster B Mk III PLS NO!!

Jim Chamberlin

War Thunder RB Squad Gameplay - Lancaster B Mk III - "For Queen and Country"

Napalmratte

WT || Ultra Cheeky Sneaky Tea - Halifax B Mk III a

Jengar

War Thunder Realistic: Halifax B.Mk.IIIa

TheEuropeanCanadian

War Thunder - Stirling B Mk. III - What do we do on Husky?

WeBe

" How to Lancaster " - War Thunder [RB Avro Lancaster III]

Larken Furchin

War Thunder Replays #1, Avro Lancaster B MK III

fear_Naught Gaming

War Thunder Lancaster B Mk.III

WeBe

" Special Mission " - War Thunder [RB Lancaster Mk. III]

Sesto Elemento

WarThunder - Halifax B Mk IIIa - You are committed to the defensive triangle

Napalmratte

War Thunder || 6 Kills in Lincoln B Mk. II and Plane Review

Orangefan

War Thunder - Lancaster Mk.I With 900 Percent Silver Lion Boost... 352483 SL!

Wiki info about Lancaster B Mk III

Official War Thunder wiki

With RAF Bomber Command’s focus being centred on the strategic bombing campaign against German industry, the RAF desperately required a force of heavy bombers to increase the capability provided by their medium bomber fleet. A twin engine Avro Manchester bomber was converted to be powered by four engines and first flown in January 1941. This and subsequent prototypes were deemed to be so successful that the first production variant of the new bomber, now named the Lancaster, was flown in October 1941. The immediate success of the Lancaster Mk I (redesignated the BI in 1942) caused it to be pushed ahead in terms of production priorities. In turn, this threatened the supply of Rolls Royce Merlin engines which powered it, so alternative engines needed to be sourced. The BII was powered by Bristol Hercules engines, but this caused a drop in performance and payload. The BIII was powered by Packard Merlin engines, a license built version manufactured in the United States. Internal differences between the BI and BIII were very few; the two models had near identical technical characteristics and armament and externally the BIII had only a larger bomb aimer’s bubble window, but the change in designation was necessary since the different engines had different servicing requirements. The Lancaster was first used operationally in March 1942 by No. 44 Squadron. It soon became the backbone of RAF Bomber Command’s offensive against the heart of Germany, but was also used against targets all across occupied Europe. The majority of Lancaster operations took place at night, due to RAF Bomber Command’s policy of night bombing whilst the bombers of the United States Army Air Force tackled targets by day. For defence, the Lancaster had eight 0.303 inch Colt-Browning Mk.II machine guns located in three turrets: two guns were located in the nose, two in the dorsal turret, and four in the tail turret. The maximum ordinance capacity of the Lancaster was the highest of any heavy bomber in World War II: 14,000 lb (6,356 kg). Besides standard bombs, the aircraft could carry an 8,000 lb (3,632 kg) “blockbuster” or two 4,000 lb (1,816 kg) high-explosive “cookie” bombs. Special modifications of the bomber could carry even larger bombs, such as the 22,000 lb ‘Grand Slam’ bomb. The Lancaster became legendary on the night of May 17th 1943 when bombers of No 617 Squadron breached the Mohne and Eder dams in Germany with Barnes Wallis’ genius ‘bouncing bomb’. Lancasters of Nos 9 and 617 Squadrons also sank the German battleship ‘Tirpitz’ with 12,000 lb ‘Tallboy’ bombs, also designed by Wallis. A total of 3,039 BIII bombers were produced. The bomber was finally decommissioned in Great Britain in 1950, and is a serious contender to the claim of being the most capable bomber of the entire war.